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Definition of Ovation

Babylon English

Roman military celebration of victory; public praise; prolonged applause from an audience
Ovation Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
(n.)
Hence: An expression of popular homage; the tribute of the multitude to a public favorite.
  
(n.)
A lesser kind of triumph allowed to a commander for an easy, bloodless victory, or a victory over slaves.
  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

ovation
\o*va"tion\ (?), n. [l. ovatio, fr. ovare to exult, rejoice, triumph in an ovation; cf. gr. &?; to shout: cf. f. ovation.]
1. (rom. antiq.) a lesser kind of triumph allowed to a commander for an easy, bloodless victory, or a victory over slaves.
2. hence: an expression of popular homage; the tribute of the multitude to a public favorite. to rain an april of ovation round their statues.

The Devil's Dictionary
Ovation, (n.)

n ancient Rome, a definite, formal pageant in honor of one who had been disserviceable to the enemies of the nation. A lesser "triumph." In modern English the word is improperly used to signify any loose and spontaneous expression of popular homage to the hero of the hour and place.

"I had an ovation!" the actor man said,
But I thought it uncommonly queer,
That people and critics by him had been led
By the ear.

The Latin lexicon makes his absurd
Assertion as plain as a peg;
In "ovum" we find the true root of the word.
It means egg.

Dudley Spink
  
The Devil's Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce, 1911 (About)
WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. enthusiastic recognition (especially one accompanied by loud applause)
(synonym) standing ovation
(hypernym) recognition, credit
(part-meronym) applause, hand clapping, clapping
Ovation Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
English Wikipedia - The Free Encyclopedia
The ovation was a form of the Roman triumph. Ovations were granted when war was not declared between enemies on the level of nations or states; when an enemy was considered basely inferior (e.g., slaves, pirates); or when the general conflict was resolved with little or no danger to the army itself.

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