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Definition of Gravitational force

Gravitational force Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
hEnglish - advanced version

gravitational force
n : the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface; "gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love"--albert einstein [syn: gravity, gravitation, gravitational attraction]



WordNet 2.0

Noun
1. (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface; "the more remote the body the less the gravity"; "the gravitation between two bodies is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them"; "gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love"--Albert Einstein
(synonym) gravity, gravitation, gravitational attraction
(hypernym) attraction, attractive force
(hyponym) solar gravity
(classification) physics, physical science, natural philosophy
Gravitational force Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
English Wikipedia - The Free Encyclopedia
Gravity or gravitation is a natural phenomenon by which all things with energy are brought towards (or 'gravitate' towards) one another, including stars, planets, galaxies and even light and sub-atomic particles. Gravity is responsible for the complexity in the universe, by creating spheres of hydrogen — where hydrogen fuses under pressure to form stars — and grouping them into galaxies. On Earth, gravity gives weight to physical objects and causes the tides. Gravity has an infinite range, although its effects become increasingly weaker on farther objects.

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Newton's law of universal gravitation states that any two bodies in the Universe attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. This is a general physical law derived from empirical observations by what Isaac Newton called induction. It is a part of classical mechanics and was formulated in Newton's work Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica ("the Principia"), first published on 5 July 1687. (When Newton's book was presented in 1686 to the Royal Society, Robert Hooke made a claim that Newton had obtained the inverse square law from him; see the History section below.)

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