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Definition of God is dead

God is dead Definition from Arts & Humanities Dictionaries & Glossaries
Theological and Philosophical Biography and Dictionary
See God-is-dead thought
God is dead Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
The Phrase Finder
Origin
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) in Die Fr÷hliche Wissenschaft. 'God is dead: but considering the state the species Man is in, there will perhaps be caves, for ages yet, in which his shadow will be shown.'
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God is dead Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
English Wikipedia - The Free Encyclopedia
"God is dead" (; also known as the death of God) is a widely quoted statement by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. It first appears in Nietzsche's 1882 collection The Gay Science (also translated as "The science of joy" German: Die fröhliche Wissenschaft) It is most famously associated however with Nietzsche's classic work Thus Spoke Zarathustra (German: Also sprach Zarathustra), which is most responsible for popularizing the phrase. The idea is stated in "The Madman" as follows:

But the best known passage is at the end of part 2 of Zarathustra's Prolog, where after beginning his allegorical journey Zarathustra encounters an aged ascetic who expresses misanthropy and love of God:

Although the statement and its meaning is attributed to Nietzsche it is important to note that this was not a unique position as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel pondered the death of God, first in his Phenomenology of Spirit where he considers the death of God to 'not [be] seen as anything but an easily recognized part of the usual Christian cycle of redemption'. Later on Hegel writes about the great pain of knowing that God is dead 'The pure concept, however, or infinity, as the abyss of nothingness in which all being sinks, must characterize the infinite pain, which previously was only in culture historically and as the feeling on which rests modern religion, the feeling that God Himself is dead, (the feeling which was uttered by Pascal, though only empirically, in his saying: Nature is such that it marks everywhere, both in and outside of man, a lost God), purely as a phase, but also as no more than just a phase, of the highest idea.' Of course the spirit in which it is intended is a verily Nietzsche manifestation, however it is important to consider the material that gave rise to this idea.

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