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Definition of A priori

Babylon English

(from Latin) "from cause to effect", deductive, valid independently of observation, formed or conceived beforehand
derived by logic independently of observation
A priori Definition from Arts & Humanities Dictionaries & Glossaries
JM Latin-English Dictionary
from what comes before
Theological and Philosophical Biography and Dictionary
Before reasoning about something, you have to
arbitrarily agree that there are some a priori rules or postulates.
certain principles or ideas are self-evident and known intuitively because of their distinctness and clarity. E.g., "I think, therefore I am" (Descartes).
Before you can intelligently experience
something, you need some a priori information, particularly some categories. Kant said that we are born with the knowledge of space and time.
Glossary of Kant's Technical Terms
a way of gaining knowledge without appealing to any particular experience(s). This method is used to establish transcendental and logical truths. (Cf. a posteriori.)
A priori Definition from Language, Idioms & Slang Dictionaries & Glossaries
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
Characterizing that kind of reasoning which deduces consequences from definitions formed, or principles assumed, or which infers effects from causes previously known; deductive or deductively. The reverse of a posteriori.

  
Applied to knowledge and conceptions assumed, or presupposed, as prior to experience, in order to make experience rational or possible.

  
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), edited by Noah Porter. About
hEnglish - advanced version

a priori
\a` pri*o"ri\ (&?;). [l. a (ab) + prior former.] 1. (logic) characterizing that kind of reasoning which deduces consequences from definitions formed, or principles assumed, or which infers effects from causes previously known; deductive or deductively. the reverse of a posteriori.
3. (philos.) applied to knowledge and conceptions assumed, or presupposed, as prior to experience, in order to make experience rational or possible. a priori, that is, form these necessities of the mind or forms of thinking, which, though first revealed to us by experience, must yet have preëxisted in order to make experience possible.

The Phrase Finder
Meaning
'From the previous'.
Origin
Latin.
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WordNet 2.0

Adjective
1. involving deductive reasoning from a general principle to a necessary effect; not supported by fact; "an a priori judgment"
(antonym) a posteriori
(see-also) analytic, analytical
2. based on hypothesis or theory rather than experiment
(similar) theoretical, theoretic

Adverb
1. derived by logic, without observed facts
(antonym) a posteriori
A priori Definition from Business & Finance Dictionaries & Glossaries
Raynet Business & Marketing Glossary
an approach where a theoretical framework is developed before an investigation/research is conducted.
Copyright © 2001, Ray Wright
A priori Definition from Encyclopedia Dictionaries & Glossaries
English Wikipedia - The Free Encyclopedia
A priori may refer to:
  • A priori knowledge, that is justified by arguments of a certain kind
  • A priori (languages), a type of constructed language
  • A priori estimate, an estimate for the size of a solution of a differential equation
  • A priori probability, that is derived by deductive reasoning
  • Apriori algorithm, an algorithm for learning association rules

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The Latin phrases a priori ( "from the earlier") and a posteriori ( "from the latter") are philosophical terms of art popularized by Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (first published in 1781, second edition in 1787), one of the most influential works in the history of philosophy. However, in their Latin forms they appear in Latin translations of Euclid's Elements, of about 300 , a work widely considered during the early European modern period as the model for precise thinking.

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A priori Definition from Law Dictionaries & Glossaries
Law Dictionary
Latin term meaning "from the former, from the first." Modern usagehas deviated significantly from the Latin. An a priori conclusion or judgmentis one that is necessarily true, that is neither proved by nor capable of beingdisproved by experience, and that is known to be true by a process of reasoningindependent of all factual evidence. The term is commonly used to indicate ajudgment that is widely believed to be certain or that is introducedpresumptively, without analysis or investigation. Thus to accuse someone ofhaving assumed a fact or conclusion a priori is often to disparage him or herfor having failed to support a judgment through evidence or analysis. Compare Aposteriori.